Progressive Hill Training

Instructions

The treadmill doesn’t have to be dreadmill, even when adverse weather conditions wreak havoc on your run training or when running outside isn’t a viable option.  Treadmill running can be a valuable training tool in maintaining the quality of your key workouts.

To help break up the boredom of stationary running, it is advised to insert variety into your treadmill workouts. Varying the incline and pace of your treadmill runs. Don’t get lazy and just set the pace and leave it.

Ascending Hill Session (45mins – 1:00hr in duration):

Warm Up: 10-20mins of easy running at 0% incline.

Main Workout Set:

  • Set to 2-3kph (1-2mph) slower than RPE8 effort @0% incline
    1. (Beginner >50mins 10k) 1:30-1:45/km (2:00 to 2:30/mile) slower
    2. (Intermediate >40mins 10k) 30-45sec/km (0:50 to 1:30/mile) slower
    3. (Advanced >35mins 10k) 30-45sec/km (0:50 to 1:12/mile) slower
  • Perform 5-10 Repetitions of

    1. Start with current settings for 3mins and set incline to 1% while simultaneously slowing down by 0.5 kph (0.3mph)

    2. After another 3mins and raise the incline to 2% while slowing down by another 0.5 kph (0.3mph).

    3. Repeat this process until your total time at RPE8 is between 15 – 30mins (5 to 10 repetitions),

  • NOTE: If your 10k Pace isn’t especially fast, it is OK to walk in the last segment or two.

  • Try adding one extra 3-minute segment as you get fitter and you improve.

Cool Down: 1-2km (0.5-1mile) – 5-10mins of easy running

Purpose

Treadmill Gradient Conversion Table:

  • Pick a desired pace on the 1st/2nd column @0% inline
  • Find the equivalent gradient (%) and the equivalent speed to set on the treadmill by going across the matching row to achieve the desired effort.
Effort KPH / MPH
Km 9.7 10.5 11.3 12.1 12.9 13.7 14.5 15.3 16.1 16.9 17.7 18.5 19.3
Km Mile 6.0 6.5 7.0 7.5 8.0 8.5 9.0 9.5 10.0 10.5 11.0 11.5 12.0
5:47 9:19 2.9 1.9
5:08 8:15 4.8 3.5 2.5
4:36 7:24 6.6 5.2 4.0 3.0 2.2
4:11 6:44 8.4 6.8 5.5 4.4 3.5 2.6
3:51 6:11 10.2 8.5 7.0 5.8 4.7 3.8 3.0 2.3
3:33 5:43 12.1 10.1 8.5 7.2 6.0 5.0 4.1 3.3 2.6 2.0
3:18 5:19 13.9 11.8 10.0 8.5 7.3 6.2 5.2 4.3 3.6 2.9 2.3
3:06 4:59 15.7 13.4 11.5 9.9 8.5 7.3 6.3 5.4 4.6 3.8 3.2 2.6 2.0
2:55 4:42 17.5 15.1 13.0 11.3 9.8 8.5 7.4 6.4 5.5 4.7 4.0 3.4 2.8
2:46 4:27 19.4 16.8 14.5 12.7 11.1 9.7 8.5 7.4 6.5 5.6 4.9 4.2 3.6
2:37 4:13 21.2 18.4 16.0 14.1 12.4 10.9 9.6 8.5 7.5 6.6 5.7 5.0 4.3
2:30 4:01 23.0 20.0 17.5 15.4 13.6 12.1 10.7 9.5 8.5 7.5 6.6 5.8 5.1
2:24 3:51 24.8 21.7 19.0 16.8 14.9 13.2 11.8 10.5 9.4 8.4 7.5 6.6 5.9

Tip

The 1% Treadmill Rule Myth Debunked:

  • The idea is that the energy cost of running on the treadmill is slightly lower than it is outdoors because you don’t have to push against air resistance. Sounds like common sense right? By raising the angle of the treadmill to 1%, this discrepancy disappears and running on the treadmill is no longer “easier” than running outdoors.
  • A study conducted by researchers where they found the energy cost of running on the treadmill was about the same as the energy cost at 5:00/km (8:03/mile) and slower. At paces 4:27/km (7:09/mile) and faster, 1% inline is required for equivalent energy cost. This is because air resistance increases at faster paces when one is running outdoors.
  • However, the flaw of this conclusion was the assumption that matching the energy cost of indoor and outdoor running are fundamentally equal. This is NOT true.
  • Empirical evidence was found that running performance is limited to by a runner’s conscious perception of effort.
  • In outdoor running, the relationship between perceived effort and endurance performance are influenced by:
    1. Produces more airflow against the body (possible air fan and 1% incline)
    2. Involves a visual perception of movement (not possible with indoor running)
    3. Promotes more dissociative thinking through greater overall visual stimulation (may be possible with indoor running studios)
    4. Subtle change of speeds between strides (not possible with indoor running)
  • In summary, don’t try to strictly equate the equivalent treadmill running pace vs outdoor running pace. The best gauge of effort is still your perceived effort. Only use the metrics as your guesstimate.
  1.