Progressive Hill Training

Instructions

The treadmill doesn’t have to be dreadmill, even when adverse weather conditions wreak havoc on your run training or when running outside isn’t a viable option.  Treadmill running can be a valuable training tool in maintaining the quality of your key workouts.

To help break up the boredom of stationary running, it is advised to insert variety into your treadmill workouts. Varying the incline and pace of your treadmill runs. Don’t get lazy and just set the pace and leave it.

Ascending Hill Session (45mins – 1:00hr in duration):

Warm Up: 10-20mins of easy running at 0% incline.

Main Workout Set:

  • Set to 2-3kph (1-2mph) slower than RPE8 effort @0% incline
    1. (Beginner >50mins 10k) 1:30-1:45/km (2:00 to 2:30/mile) slower
    2. (Intermediate >40mins 10k) 30-45sec/km (0:50 to 1:30/mile) slower
    3. (Advanced >35mins 10k) 30-45sec/km (0:50 to 1:12/mile) slower
  • Perform 5-10 Repetitions of

    1. Start with current settings for 3mins and set incline to 1% while simultaneously slowing down by 0.5 kph (0.3mph)

    2. After another 3mins and raise the incline to 2% while slowing down by another 0.5 kph (0.3mph).

    3. Repeat this process until your total time at RPE8 is between 15 – 30mins (5 to 10 repetitions),

  • NOTE: If your 10k Pace isn’t especially fast, it is OK to walk in the last segment or two.

  • Try adding one extra 3-minute segment as you get fitter and you improve.

Cool Down: 1-2km (0.5-1mile) – 5-10mins of easy running

Purpose

Treadmill Gradient Conversion Table:

  • Pick a desired pace on the 1st/2nd column @0% inline
  • Find the equivalent gradient (%) and the equivalent speed to set on the treadmill by going across the matching row to achieve the desired effort.
Effort KPH / MPH
Km 9.7 10.5 11.3 12.1 12.9 13.7 14.5 15.3 16.1 16.9 17.7 18.5 19.3
Km Mile 6.0 6.5 7.0 7.5 8.0 8.5 9.0 9.5 10.0 10.5 11.0 11.5 12.0
5:47 9:19 2.9 1.9
5:08 8:15 4.8 3.5 2.5
4:36 7:24 6.6 5.2 4.0 3.0 2.2
4:11 6:44 8.4 6.8 5.5 4.4 3.5 2.6
3:51 6:11 10.2 8.5 7.0 5.8 4.7 3.8 3.0 2.3
3:33 5:43 12.1 10.1 8.5 7.2 6.0 5.0 4.1 3.3 2.6 2.0
3:18 5:19 13.9 11.8 10.0 8.5 7.3 6.2 5.2 4.3 3.6 2.9 2.3
3:06 4:59 15.7 13.4 11.5 9.9 8.5 7.3 6.3 5.4 4.6 3.8 3.2 2.6 2.0
2:55 4:42 17.5 15.1 13.0 11.3 9.8 8.5 7.4 6.4 5.5 4.7 4.0 3.4 2.8
2:46 4:27 19.4 16.8 14.5 12.7 11.1 9.7 8.5 7.4 6.5 5.6 4.9 4.2 3.6
2:37 4:13 21.2 18.4 16.0 14.1 12.4 10.9 9.6 8.5 7.5 6.6 5.7 5.0 4.3
2:30 4:01 23.0 20.0 17.5 15.4 13.6 12.1 10.7 9.5 8.5 7.5 6.6 5.8 5.1
2:24 3:51 24.8 21.7 19.0 16.8 14.9 13.2 11.8 10.5 9.4 8.4 7.5 6.6 5.9

Tip

The 1% Treadmill Rule Myth Debunked:

  • The idea is that the energy cost of running on the treadmill is slightly lower than it is outdoors because you don’t have to push against air resistance. Sounds like common sense right? By raising the angle of the treadmill to 1%, this discrepancy disappears and running on the treadmill is no longer “easier” than running outdoors.
  • A study conducted by researchers where they found the energy cost of running on the treadmill was about the same as the energy cost at 5:00/km (8:03/mile) and slower. At paces 4:27/km (7:09/mile) and faster, 1% inline is required for equivalent energy cost. This is because air resistance increases at faster paces when one is running outdoors.
  • However, the flaw of this conclusion was the assumption that matching the energy cost of indoor and outdoor running are fundamentally equal. This is NOT true.
  • Empirical evidence was found that running performance is limited to by a runner’s conscious perception of effort.
  • In outdoor running, the relationship between perceived effort and endurance performance are influenced by:
    1. Produces more airflow against the body (possible air fan and 1% incline)
    2. Involves a visual perception of movement (not possible with indoor running)
    3. Promotes more dissociative thinking through greater overall visual stimulation (may be possible with indoor running studios)
    4. Subtle change of speeds between strides (not possible with indoor running)
  • In summary, don’t try to strictly equate the equivalent treadmill running pace vs outdoor running pace. The best gauge of effort is still your perceived effort. Only use the metrics as your guesstimate.
  1.  

Easy Long Runs

Instructions

The treadmill doesn’t have to be dreadmill, even when adverse weather conditions wreak havoc on your run training or when running outside isn’t a viable option.  Treadmill running can be a valuable training tool in maintaining the quality of your key workouts.

To help break up the boredom of stationary running, it is advised to insert variety into your treadmill workouts. Varying the incline and pace of your treadmill runs. Don’t get lazy and just set the pace and leave it.

Long Run Session (1:30 – 2:30hr in duration):

Warm Up: 15-20mins of easy running at 0% incline.

Main Workout Set:

  1. Execute the pre-assigned workout as noted and get a nice fan blowing at you to cool yourself off during these long efforts 
  2. If the workout calls for a long easy “monotonous” run, consider switching things up and vary the pace/incline every 10-15mins or so (pick up a pace a notch) with a short pickup of 1-2mins @1-2% incline to break up the boredom.
  3. Practice your nutrition and fueling strategies to simulate race day.

Cool Down: 2-5km (1-3miles) – 10-30mins of easy running

Purpose

Treadmill Gradient Conversion Table:

  • Pick a desired pace on the 1st/2nd column @0% inline
  • Find the equivalent gradient (%) and the equivalent speed to set on the treadmill by going across the matching row to achieve the desired effort.
Effort KPH / MPH
Km 9.7 10.5 11.3 12.1 12.9 13.7 14.5 15.3 16.1 16.9 17.7 18.5 19.3
Km Mile 6.0 6.5 7.0 7.5 8.0 8.5 9.0 9.5 10.0 10.5 11.0 11.5 12.0
5:47 9:19 2.9 1.9
5:08 8:15 4.8 3.5 2.5
4:36 7:24 6.6 5.2 4.0 3.0 2.2
4:11 6:44 8.4 6.8 5.5 4.4 3.5 2.6
3:51 6:11 10.2 8.5 7.0 5.8 4.7 3.8 3.0 2.3
3:33 5:43 12.1 10.1 8.5 7.2 6.0 5.0 4.1 3.3 2.6 2.0
3:18 5:19 13.9 11.8 10.0 8.5 7.3 6.2 5.2 4.3 3.6 2.9 2.3
3:06 4:59 15.7 13.4 11.5 9.9 8.5 7.3 6.3 5.4 4.6 3.8 3.2 2.6 2.0
2:55 4:42 17.5 15.1 13.0 11.3 9.8 8.5 7.4 6.4 5.5 4.7 4.0 3.4 2.8
2:46 4:27 19.4 16.8 14.5 12.7 11.1 9.7 8.5 7.4 6.5 5.6 4.9 4.2 3.6
2:37 4:13 21.2 18.4 16.0 14.1 12.4 10.9 9.6 8.5 7.5 6.6 5.7 5.0 4.3
2:30 4:01 23.0 20.0 17.5 15.4 13.6 12.1 10.7 9.5 8.5 7.5 6.6 5.8 5.1
2:24 3:51 24.8 21.7 19.0 16.8 14.9 13.2 11.8 10.5 9.4 8.4 7.5 6.6 5.9

Tip

Honing Your Running Form on Treadmill:

Treadmills are a great way to observe your running form and correct any mistakes or tendencies that you have.

  1. Toes & Knees Straight Ahead
    1. To begin, take note of which direction your toes & knees are facing as your foot strikes the ground, and when your lift your knees
    2. You want to be sure that your toes face straight ahead, not doing so can strain your knees.
    3. If this is a challenge for you, cut back your speed and incline and just run at a slow to moderate speed while you get your feet in line.
  2. Run Tall
    1. Running with good posture is the foundation for proper running form. For example, in order to run tall, you need to engage your glutes as you run.
    2. As we get tired, it’s common for runners to slouch, tilt their hips and disengage the glutes.
    3. Squeeze those glutes and run tall especially when you feel totally gassed.
    4. This is especially pronounced when going uphill. The natural tendency is to lean forward and rock our hips back. Staying tall even as you ascend.
    5. It’s all about building muscle memory on good habits, which because we always default to our old habits when fatigue sets in!
  3. Coordinating with your Arm Swing
    1. Keep your arms relaxed and don’t let your arms cross the midline of your body, avoiding the possibility of any twisting action.
    2. Crossing your arms over your midline causes lower back and abdominal issues, as that twisting motion repeated over a long time is strenuous on the muscle groups in your torso.

Hill Training

Instructions

The treadmill doesn’t have to be dreadmill, even when adverse weather conditions wreak havoc on your run training or when running outside isn’t a viable option.  Treadmill running can be a valuable training tool in maintaining the quality of your key workouts.

To help break up the boredom of stationary running, it is advised to insert variety into your treadmill workouts. Varying the incline and pace of your treadmill runs. Don’t get lazy and just set the pace and leave it.

Hill Training Session (1:00 – 1:30hr in duration):

Warm Up: 10-15mins of easy running with a 4 – 6 x 30secs Strides.

Main Workout Set:

  1. Set your treadmill to
    • (Beginner) 3-5% incline
    • (Intermediate) 6-8% incline
    • (Advanced) 10-12% inline
  2. 800m (1/2mile) “climbs” @RPE7 effort (10k pace) with easy recovery @0% incline w/3-4mins of recovery.
    • (Beginner) 4-6 repetitions
    • (Intermediate) 6-8 repetitions
    • (Advanced) 6-8 repetitions

Cool Down: 2-5km (1-3miles) – 15-30mins of easy running

Purpose

Treadmill Gradient Conversion Table:

  • Pick a desired pace on the 1st/2nd column @0% inline
  • Find the equivalent gradient (%) and the equivalent speed to set on the treadmill by going across the matching row to achieve the desired effort.
Effort KPH / MPH
Km 9.7 10.5 11.3 12.1 12.9 13.7 14.5 15.3 16.1 16.9 17.7 18.5 19.3
Km Mile 6.0 6.5 7.0 7.5 8.0 8.5 9.0 9.5 10.0 10.5 11.0 11.5 12.0
5:47 9:19 2.9 1.9
5:08 8:15 4.8 3.5 2.5
4:36 7:24 6.6 5.2 4.0 3.0 2.2
4:11 6:44 8.4 6.8 5.5 4.4 3.5 2.6
3:51 6:11 10.2 8.5 7.0 5.8 4.7 3.8 3.0 2.3
3:33 5:43 12.1 10.1 8.5 7.2 6.0 5.0 4.1 3.3 2.6 2.0
3:18 5:19 13.9 11.8 10.0 8.5 7.3 6.2 5.2 4.3 3.6 2.9 2.3
3:06 4:59 15.7 13.4 11.5 9.9 8.5 7.3 6.3 5.4 4.6 3.8 3.2 2.6 2.0
2:55 4:42 17.5 15.1 13.0 11.3 9.8 8.5 7.4 6.4 5.5 4.7 4.0 3.4 2.8
2:46 4:27 19.4 16.8 14.5 12.7 11.1 9.7 8.5 7.4 6.5 5.6 4.9 4.2 3.6
2:37 4:13 21.2 18.4 16.0 14.1 12.4 10.9 9.6 8.5 7.5 6.6 5.7 5.0 4.3
2:30 4:01 23.0 20.0 17.5 15.4 13.6 12.1 10.7 9.5 8.5 7.5 6.6 5.8 5.1
2:24 3:51 24.8 21.7 19.0 16.8 14.9 13.2 11.8 10.5 9.4 8.4 7.5 6.6 5.9

Tip

The 1% Treadmill Rule Myth Debunked:

  • The idea is that the energy cost of running on the treadmill is slightly lower than it is outdoors because you don’t have to push against air resistance. Sounds like common sense right? By raising the angle of the treadmill to 1%, this discrepancy disappears and running on the treadmill is no longer “easier” than running outdoors.
  • A study conducted by researchers where they found the energy cost of running on the treadmill was about the same as the energy cost at 5:00/km (8:03/mile) and slower. At paces 4:27/km (7:09/mile) and faster, 1% inline is required for equivalent energy cost. This is because air resistance increases at faster paces when one is running outdoors.
  • However, the flaw of this conclusion was the assumption that matching the energy cost of indoor and outdoor running are fundamentally equal. This is NOT true.
  • Empirical evidence was found that running performance is limited to by a runner’s conscious perception of effort.
  • In outdoor running, the relationship between perceived effort and endurance performance are influenced by:
    1. Produces more airflow against the body (possible air fan and 1% incline)
    2. Involves a visual perception of movement (not possible with indoor running)
    3. Promotes more dissociative thinking through greater overall visual stimulation (may be possible with indoor running studios)
    4. Subtle change of speeds between strides (not possible with indoor running)
  • In summary, don’t try to strictly equate the equivalent treadmill running pace vs outdoor running pace. The best gauge of effort is still your perceived effort. Only use the metrics as your guesstimate.
  1.  

Progression Runs

Instructions

The treadmill doesn’t have to be dreadmill, even when adverse weather conditions wreak havoc on your run training or when running outside isn’t a viable option.  Treadmill running can be a valuable training tool in maintaining the quality of your key workouts.

To help break up the boredom of stationary running, it is advised to insert variety into your treadmill workouts. Varying the incline and pace of your treadmill runs. Don’t get lazy and just set the pace and leave it.

Progression Session (1:30 – 1:45hr in duration):

Warm Up: 20-30mins of easy running with a 2 – 3 x 30secs Strides.

Main Workout Set: 10km (6miles) Progression Run

  1. Start by running 3km (2miles) @RPE5 (~Marathon Race Pace)
  2. 4 x 1.6km (4 x 1mile), at every interval increase your speed by  6sec/km (10sec/mile).
  3. So, for example, if you your marathon pace is 5:00/km (8:00/mile), your next 4 intervals would be 4:54 (7:50), 4:48 (7:40), 4:42 (7:30), 4:36 (7:20).
  4. This roughly equates to progressing from Marathon Pace down to 10K pace —a challenging workout that will keep you on your toes. 

Cool Down: 2-5km (1-3miles) – 15-30mins of easy running

Purpose

Treadmill Gradient Conversion Table:

  • Pick a desired pace on the 1st/2nd column @0% inline
  • Find the equivalent gradient (%) and the equivalent speed to set on the treadmill by going across the matching row to achieve the desired effort.
Effort KPH / MPH
Km 9.7 10.5 11.3 12.1 12.9 13.7 14.5 15.3 16.1 16.9 17.7 18.5 19.3
Km Mile 6.0 6.5 7.0 7.5 8.0 8.5 9.0 9.5 10.0 10.5 11.0 11.5 12.0
5:47 9:19 2.9 1.9
5:08 8:15 4.8 3.5 2.5
4:36 7:24 6.6 5.2 4.0 3.0 2.2
4:11 6:44 8.4 6.8 5.5 4.4 3.5 2.6
3:51 6:11 10.2 8.5 7.0 5.8 4.7 3.8 3.0 2.3
3:33 5:43 12.1 10.1 8.5 7.2 6.0 5.0 4.1 3.3 2.6 2.0
3:18 5:19 13.9 11.8 10.0 8.5 7.3 6.2 5.2 4.3 3.6 2.9 2.3
3:06 4:59 15.7 13.4 11.5 9.9 8.5 7.3 6.3 5.4 4.6 3.8 3.2 2.6 2.0
2:55 4:42 17.5 15.1 13.0 11.3 9.8 8.5 7.4 6.4 5.5 4.7 4.0 3.4 2.8
2:46 4:27 19.4 16.8 14.5 12.7 11.1 9.7 8.5 7.4 6.5 5.6 4.9 4.2 3.6
2:37 4:13 21.2 18.4 16.0 14.1 12.4 10.9 9.6 8.5 7.5 6.6 5.7 5.0 4.3
2:30 4:01 23.0 20.0 17.5 15.4 13.6 12.1 10.7 9.5 8.5 7.5 6.6 5.8 5.1
2:24 3:51 24.8 21.7 19.0 16.8 14.9 13.2 11.8 10.5 9.4 8.4 7.5 6.6 5.9

Tip

The 1% Treadmill Rule Myth Debunked:

  • The idea is that the energy cost of running on the treadmill is slightly lower than it is outdoors because you don’t have to push against air resistance. Sounds like common sense right? By raising the angle of the treadmill to 1%, this discrepancy disappears and running on the treadmill is no longer “easier” than running outdoors.
  • A study conducted by researchers where they found the energy cost of running on the treadmill was about the same as the energy cost at 5:00/km (8:03/mile) and slower. At paces 4:27/km (7:09/mile) and faster, 1% inline is required for equivalent energy cost. This is because air resistance increases at faster paces when one is running outdoors.
  • However, the flaw of this conclusion was the assumption that matching the energy cost of indoor and outdoor running are fundamentally equal. This is NOT true.
  • Empirical evidence was found that running performance is limited to by a runner’s conscious perception of effort.
  • In outdoor running, the relationship between perceived effort and endurance performance are influenced by:
    1. Produces more airflow against the body (possible air fan and 1% incline)
    2. Involves a visual perception of movement (not possible with indoor running)
    3. Promotes more dissociative thinking through greater overall visual stimulation (may be possible with indoor running studios)
    4. Subtle change of speeds between strides (not possible with indoor running)
  • In summary, don’t try to strictly equate the equivalent treadmill running pace vs outdoor running pace. The best gauge of effort is still your perceived effort. Only use the metrics as your guesstimate.
  1.  

Strides Workouts

Instructions

The treadmill doesn’t have to be dreadmill, even when adverse weather conditions wreak havoc on your run training or when running outside isn’t a viable option.  Treadmill running can be a valuable training tool in maintaining the quality of your key workouts.

To help break up the boredom of stationary running, it is advised to insert variety into your treadmill workouts. Varying the incline and pace of your treadmill runs. Don’t get lazy and just set the pace and leave it.

Strides Session (35mins – 1:00hr in duration):

Warm Up: 10-15mins of easy running with a 2 – 3 x 30secs Strides.

Main Workout Set:

  1. Alternate running 400m (1/4 miles) @RPE8-9 (5K-10K pace) with 400m (1/4 miles) @6sec/km (10secs/mile) slower.
  2. Repeat this sequence for as long as possible until you can no longer maintain the target paces. (Be honest with yourself and not strain to achieve your goal)
  3. This is a workout you could do on a regular basis when the time is limited.
  4. You get some specific work but the faster rests prevent it from becoming so anaerobic

Cool Down: 2-5km (1-3miles) – 10-30mins of easy running

Purpose

Treadmill Gradient Conversion Table:

  • Pick a desired pace on the 1st/2nd column @0% inline
  • Find the equivalent gradient (%) and the equivalent speed to set on the treadmill by going across the matching row to achieve the desired effort.
Effort KPH / MPH
Km 9.7 10.5 11.3 12.1 12.9 13.7 14.5 15.3 16.1 16.9 17.7 18.5 19.3
Km Mile 6.0 6.5 7.0 7.5 8.0 8.5 9.0 9.5 10.0 10.5 11.0 11.5 12.0
5:47 9:19 2.9 1.9
5:08 8:15 4.8 3.5 2.5
4:36 7:24 6.6 5.2 4.0 3.0 2.2
4:11 6:44 8.4 6.8 5.5 4.4 3.5 2.6
3:51 6:11 10.2 8.5 7.0 5.8 4.7 3.8 3.0 2.3
3:33 5:43 12.1 10.1 8.5 7.2 6.0 5.0 4.1 3.3 2.6 2.0
3:18 5:19 13.9 11.8 10.0 8.5 7.3 6.2 5.2 4.3 3.6 2.9 2.3
3:06 4:59 15.7 13.4 11.5 9.9 8.5 7.3 6.3 5.4 4.6 3.8 3.2 2.6 2.0
2:55 4:42 17.5 15.1 13.0 11.3 9.8 8.5 7.4 6.4 5.5 4.7 4.0 3.4 2.8
2:46 4:27 19.4 16.8 14.5 12.7 11.1 9.7 8.5 7.4 6.5 5.6 4.9 4.2 3.6
2:37 4:13 21.2 18.4 16.0 14.1 12.4 10.9 9.6 8.5 7.5 6.6 5.7 5.0 4.3
2:30 4:01 23.0 20.0 17.5 15.4 13.6 12.1 10.7 9.5 8.5 7.5 6.6 5.8 5.1
2:24 3:51 24.8 21.7 19.0 16.8 14.9 13.2 11.8 10.5 9.4 8.4 7.5 6.6 5.9

Tip

Honing Your Running Form on Treadmill:

Treadmills are a great way to observe your running form and correct any mistakes or tendencies that you have.

  1. Toes & Knees Straight Ahead
    1. To begin, take note of which direction your toes & knees are facing as your foot strikes the ground, and when your lift your knees
    2. You want to be sure that your toes face straight ahead, not doing so can strain your knees.
    3. If this is a challenge for you, cut back your speed and incline and just run at a slow to moderate speed while you get your feet in line.
  2. Run Tall
    1. Running with good posture is the foundation for proper running form. For example, in order to run tall, you need to engage your glutes as you run.
    2. As we get tired, it’s common for runners to slouch, tilt their hips and disengage the glutes.
    3. Squeeze those glutes and run tall especially when you feel totally gassed.
    4. This is especially pronounced when going uphill. The natural tendency is to lean forward and rock our hips back. Staying tall even as you ascend.
    5. It’s all about building muscle memory on good habits, which because we always default to our old habits when fatigue sets in!
  3. Coordinating with your Arm Swing
    1. Keep your arms relaxed and don’t let your arms cross the midline of your body, avoiding the possibility of any twisting action.
    2. Crossing your arms over your midline causes lower back and abdominal issues, as that twisting motion repeated over a long time is strenuous on the muscle groups in your torso.

Tempo Workouts

Instructions

The treadmill doesn’t have to be dreadmill, even when adverse weather conditions wreak havoc on your run training or when running outside isn’t a viable option.  Treadmill running can be a valuable training tool in maintaining the quality of your key workouts.

To help break up the boredom of stationary running, it is advised to insert variety into your treadmill workouts. Varying the incline and pace of your treadmill runs. Don’t get lazy and just set the pace and leave it.

Treadmil Tempo (45mins – 1:35hr in duration):

Warm Up: 10-15mins of easy running with a 2 – 3 x 30secs Strides.

Main Workout Set:

  • Depending on the Assigned Duration of your workout and run at RPE5-6, select ONE of the following:
Minutes Workouts
20 Steady 20-min run
30 6 × 5 min with 1-min rest
3 × 10 min with 2-min rest
2 × 15 min with 3-min rest
40 8 × 5 min with 1-min rest
5 × 8 min with 1-min rest
4 × 10 min with 2-min rest
15 min with 3-min rest, 2 × 10 min with 2-min rest, 5 min
50 10 × 5 min with 1-min rest
5 × 10 min with 2-min rest
2 × 15 min with 3-min rest, 2 × 10 min with 2-min rest
60 6 × 10 min with 2-min rest
4 × 15 min with 3-min rest
2 × 15 min with 3-min rest, 2 × 10 min with 2-min rest, 2 × 5 min with 1-min rest

Cool Down: 2-3km (1-2miles) – 15-20mins of easy running

Purpose

Treadmill Gradient Conversion Table:

  • Pick a desired pace on the 1st/2nd column @0% inline
  • Find the equivalent gradient (%) and the equivalent speed to set on the treadmill by going across the matching row to achieve the desired effort.
Effort KPH / MPH
Km 9.7 10.5 11.3 12.1 12.9 13.7 14.5 15.3 16.1 16.9 17.7 18.5 19.3
Km Mile 6.0 6.5 7.0 7.5 8.0 8.5 9.0 9.5 10.0 10.5 11.0 11.5 12.0
5:47 9:19 2.9 1.9
5:08 8:15 4.8 3.5 2.5
4:36 7:24 6.6 5.2 4.0 3.0 2.2
4:11 6:44 8.4 6.8 5.5 4.4 3.5 2.6
3:51 6:11 10.2 8.5 7.0 5.8 4.7 3.8 3.0 2.3
3:33 5:43 12.1 10.1 8.5 7.2 6.0 5.0 4.1 3.3 2.6 2.0
3:18 5:19 13.9 11.8 10.0 8.5 7.3 6.2 5.2 4.3 3.6 2.9 2.3
3:06 4:59 15.7 13.4 11.5 9.9 8.5 7.3 6.3 5.4 4.6 3.8 3.2 2.6 2.0
2:55 4:42 17.5 15.1 13.0 11.3 9.8 8.5 7.4 6.4 5.5 4.7 4.0 3.4 2.8
2:46 4:27 19.4 16.8 14.5 12.7 11.1 9.7 8.5 7.4 6.5 5.6 4.9 4.2 3.6
2:37 4:13 21.2 18.4 16.0 14.1 12.4 10.9 9.6 8.5 7.5 6.6 5.7 5.0 4.3
2:30 4:01 23.0 20.0 17.5 15.4 13.6 12.1 10.7 9.5 8.5 7.5 6.6 5.8 5.1
2:24 3:51 24.8 21.7 19.0 16.8 14.9 13.2 11.8 10.5 9.4 8.4 7.5 6.6 5.9

Tip

The 1% Treadmill Rule Myth Debunked:

  • The idea is that the energy cost of running on the treadmill is slightly lower than it is outdoors because you don’t have to push against air resistance. Sounds like common sense right? By raising the angle of the treadmill to 1%, this discrepancy disappears and running on the treadmill is no longer “easier” than running outdoors.
  • A study conducted by researchers where they found the energy cost of running on the treadmill was about the same as the energy cost at 5:00/km (8:03/mile) and slower. At paces 4:27/km (7:09/mile) and faster, 1% inline is required for equivalent energy cost. This is because air resistance increases at faster paces when one is running outdoors.
  • However, the flaw of this conclusion was the assumption that matching the energy cost of indoor and outdoor running are fundamentally equal. This is NOT true.
  • Empirical evidence was found that running performance is limited to by a runner’s conscious perception of effort.
  • In outdoor running, the relationship between perceived effort and endurance performance are influenced by:
    1. Produces more airflow against the body (possible air fan and 1% incline)
    2. Involves a visual perception of movement (not possible with indoor running)
    3. Promotes more dissociative thinking through greater overall visual stimulation (may be possible with indoor running studios)
    4. Subtle change of speeds between strides (not possible with indoor running)
  • In summary, don’t try to strictly equate the equivalent treadmill running pace vs outdoor running pace. The best gauge of effort is still your perceived effort. Only use the metrics as your guesstimate.
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